Gary Shilling’s Bearishness Doesn’t Seem Nutty

The recession will now turn deeper and the Federal Reserve is worried about deflation.

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Delinquent Mortgages Hit Record 15%

  • The percentage of loans that were in foreclosure or behind at least one payment hit 15.02%, the most since MBA’s records began in 1972.   Foreclosures will likely stay high in 2010.
  • Real estate Web site Zillow.com recently said one in five homeowners were underwater in Q4!!
  • 4.5 million foreclosure filings are expected this year, up from 2.8 million in 2009.
  • “The bulk of foreclosures are coming in spring and summer, and we do expect home prices to continue falling through the end of this year,” said Celia Chen, director of housing economics at Moody’s Economy.com.

One In Three Chance You’ll Soon Owe More Than Your House Is Worth: Tech Ticker, Yahoo! Finance

One In Three Chance You’ll Soon Owe More Than Your House Is WorthPosted Aug 20, 2009 11:15am EDT by Henry BlodgetRelated: xhb, tol, len, kbh, dhi, phmForeclosure rates in the U.S. remain near record highs. More than 13% of American homeowners with a mortgage are either behind on their payments or in foreclosure. The latest report from the Mortgage Bankers Association, released today, shows the percentage of loans that entered the foreclosure process dipped slightly to 1.36%, down from an all-time high of 1.37% in the first quarter.However, that number may soon rise again as mortgage delinquency rates continued to climb in the second quarter.That news is no surprise to Karen Weaver of Deutsche Bank. She startled everyone a few weeks ago when she predicted that, by 2011, nearly half of American mortgage holders would be underwater (meaning that they’ll owe more on their mortgages than their houses were worth).Half of mortgage holders means about one-third of American households. Put another way, Weaver forecasts 25 million mortgage holders will be under water by 2011, up from an estimated 14 million currently.Aside from the mega-bummer of owing the bank more than your house is worth, underwater mortgages exacerbate another problem: foreclosures. In previous housing busts, being underwater led to a greater likelihood of default, and Weaver believes this the foreclosure problem will be much worse this time around.In a recent report, Weaver analyzed all the various kinds of mortgages in the US and estimated that 48% of them would be underwater by 2011. This includes “prime” borrowers, of whom a startling 41% will be underwater.

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AP Poll: Mortgage Payments Worry Many

US News and World Report

Apr 14, 3:26 PM EDT

AP Poll: Mortgage Payments Worry Many


WASHINGTON (AP) — One in seven mortgage holders worry they may soon fail to make their monthly payments and even more fret that their home’s value is shrinking, according to a poll showing widespread stress from the nation’s housing crisis.

In an ominous snapshot of how the sagging real estate market and sour economy are intersecting, the Associated Press-AOL Money & Finance poll also found that 60 percent said they definitely won’t a buy a home in the next two years. Continue reading

2007 Mortgage Meltdown

Double-digit home price drops coming

 By Les Christie, CNNMoney.com staff writer – September 19 2007: 3:24 pm

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) — Over the next few years, more than three-quarters of the nation’s housing markets will suffer some decline in home prices. Many will experience double-digit hits in a forecast that has worsened considerably in recent months.

According to an analysis conducted by Moody’s Economy.com, declines will exceed 10 percent in 86 of the 379 largest housing markets. And 290 of the cities will experience price drops of 1 percent or more.

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The survey attempted to identify the high and low points of housing prices in each of the markets, some of which started declining from their peak in the third quarter of 2005. All are median prices for single-family houses.

Nationally, Moody’s is projecting an average price decline of 7.7 percent. That’s a jump from the 6.6 percent total price drop that the company was forecasting in June and more than twice that of last October’s forecast of a 3.6 percent price decrease.

Many of the worst hit cities are in Sun Belt areas that experienced outsized home-price growth during the real estate bubble, according to Arnold Slesers, an associate economist at Moody’s. The home price correction in many of these cities will be severe as unsold new homes and leaps in foreclosures add to already big inventories. Continue reading