Do You Know If Your Covered? Learn FDIC Insurance Limits

What does the FDIC do?

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) preserves and promotes public confidence in the U.S. financial system by insuring deposits in banks and thrift institutions for up to $250,000 (through December 31, 2013).

What are the basic FDIC coverage limits?

  • Single Accounts (owned by one person):  $250,000 per owner
  • Joint Accounts (two or more persons):  $250,000 per co-owner
  • IRAs and other certain retirement accounts:  $250,000 per owner

What types of accounts are eligible for FDIC insurance?

FDIC insurance covers all deposit accounts at insured banks and savings associations, including checking, NOW, and savings accounts, money market deposit accounts and certificates of deposit (CDs) up to the insurance limit.

The FDIC does not insure the money you invest in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, life insurance policies, annuities or municipal securities, even if you purchased these products from an insured bank or savings association.

Need More Information? Go to:  https://www.fdic.gov/edie/fdic_info.html#04

Dick Bove Says, Banks Don’t Want Your Business – May Cancel Your Account and Give Customers the Boot

Not happy with your bank? The feeling is likely mutual.Don’t be surprised if your bank soon decides they don’t want your business anymore, says Rochdale Securities bank analyst Dick Bove.Why?Bank regulators and Congress are looking at ways at making the system more safe and sound in order to avoid another meltdown. What on the surface seems like a wise and prudent decision, however may have unintended consequences, most notably higher fees for bounced checks, credit card balances and the like.”The way a bank discourages a customer from doing business with it is to make the cost of doing business so high the customer gets upset and leaves,” Bove says. “I think that’s the methodology,” although some unprofitable accounts will be closed by the banks, as American Express has been doing. (AmEx canceled 3.3 million cards globally in the second and third quarters, TheStreet.com reports.)Update: In another example, HSBC “has decided retail customers aren’t profitable enough and is demanding those clients remove their gold to make room for more lucrative institutional customers,” The WSJ reports.Bove says as much as 30% of U.S. households could find themselves being forced out of their banks since they’re not deemed profitable.The shift will create investment opportunities as depositors look to other companies to provide banking services. In this scenario, Bove thinks consumer finance firms, payment system companies, pay-day loan companies and pawn shops will pick up the slack.As the government moves to make the cost of banking higher for the banks, they’re going to have to pass on those costs to the consumer,” Bove says. “If the consumer doesn’t like it, the consumer is going to have to rely on these less-established methodologies of getting finance and moving money.” ———————–The FDIC fund that insures bank deposits is $8.2 billion in the hole.The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. released its latest set of grim banking data moments ago. The FDIC had to set aside $21.7 billion for expected losses on future bank failures as the total number of “problem” banks rose to 552 from 416.There were glimmers of hope. While bad loans continue to beat up bank balance sheets, revenues are returning to the banking sector. Overall, the banking sector was profitable after a $4.3 billion loss in the second quarter and saw just $879 million in earnings last year.

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“Astounded” by Goldman’s Upgrade Banks “Heading Into the Storm” Whalen Says: Tech Ticker, Yahoo! Finance

Goldman Sachs making headlines again. Today, it’s on two accounts.First, Bloomberg is reporting Goldman could earn about $1 billion should the troubled lender CIT Group, enter bankruptcy or otherwise end a $3 billion financing agreement. I’m sure it’s adding fuel to the fire for the “Government Sachs” conspiracy theorists, who probably see it as a repeat of what happened with the AIG bailout.For those that don’t remember, Goldman received $12.9 billion from AIG after the government rescued the world’s largest insurer. That raised suspicions of conflicts of interest and unfair treatment, since then Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson also happened to be a former CEO at Goldman.Chris Whalen of Institutional Risk Analytics is a Goldman conspiracy sympathizer and someone who “doesn’t like their politics.” But, in this case, he doesn’t necessarily think anything is askew. “Like any distressed lender they have a right to their payment. They took the risk,” he admits.What strikes Whalen as more curious is Goldman’s call on the big banks. Citing a positive outlook on earnings, Goldman analysts raised the outlook on banks from neutral to “attractive” this morning. They also upgraded Wells Fargo to “buy” from “neutral”, Comerica to “neutral” from “sell”, and added Capital One to their “conviction buy” list.Whalen is “astounded” Goldman would make such a move “when the banking industry is heading into the storm.” Contrary to the Goldman call, Whalen says the earnings outlook will get worse over the next two quarters, culminating in a bloodbath in the fourth quarter. Part of the problem for Wells Fargo, according to Whalen, is the bank still has plenty of write-downs to come associated with the Wachovia merger, as detailed here. But Goldman employees and shareholders have no fear. Whalen is confident the firm will fare better than those it upgraded today, “because they’re not a bank.” Instead, he says, you must consider Goldman, “a trading operation with a private equity firm attached.”If there is a risk for Goldman, it is political. “They are so visible and so high profile,” Whalen speculates, “that if the economy doesn’t recover next year I think Goldman is in for some severe criticism.”And that, no doubt, would please the Goldman conspiracy crowd.

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